Tag Archives: software

Github: Forking and Contributing Workflow

I stick to following workflow while contributing to open-source projects on Github:

  1. Fork <user>/<repo> to abdul/<repo>
  2. git clone [email protected]:abdul/<repo>.git
  3. git remote add upstream [email protected]:<user>/<repo>.git
  4. git checkout -b <topic_branch>
  5. Fix, Add or Change things (code, documentation, etc.)
  6. git add <files>
  7. git commit -m <commit-message>
  8. Repeat #5 , #6 & #7
  9. git pull --rebase upstream master
  10. Resolve any conflicts, if required
  11. Squash Commits, e.g. squashing last three commits:
    • git rebase -i HEAD~3
  12. git push origin <topic_branch>
  13. Go to github.com/abdul/<repo>
  14. Create a Pull Request [Github is smart enough to detect a change in forked repo, and offer you to compare and create pull-request]
  15. Discuss changes in PR, and Fix things in branch as required.


I recently came to know about Toptal. I am impressed and happy to see that some of the top developers of world are contributing and making difference through Toptal’s platform. I want to be among them for only one reason:

  • I want to work on (and contribute to some of) the best, useful and challenging projects with possibility to collaborate with some of the top/best developers/designers of the world.


Phabricator (pronounced like the word fabricator) is a suite of web applications which make it easier to build software, particularly when working with teams. Phabricator is largely based on Facebook’s internal tools.

It has been more than three years since I have been using Phabricator (self-hosted) at work. It is one of the open-source projects which has inspired me a lot. I have seen it grow over these years; every day it gets better. Thanks to hundreds of open-source developers for their contribution.

Want to see how to develop elegant and sophisticated software, even with a poor programming languages like PHP? Look at Phabricator’s source-code and tools (built using PHP), you would be awestruck.

Want to play with Phabricator without installing? Have a look at PhorePlay (Phabricator hosting service), which offers free Phabricator hosting (with multiple instances) up to five users.  I think, that’s good enough for most of us (small teams).

Phabricator’s core team is working to launch Phacility (Phabricator Hosting). I think, it has potential to become something like Github (useful and essential service) one day.

We’re Hiring Developers!

We have been working on bunch of products (indiereign.com, and others) for sometime. To take these products to next level, quickly and elegantly, we have recently started expanding our team.

We are starting our new development centre in Noida. We want to connect, talk to and hire smart and passionate developers (hackers) who love to work on products in a small company or a startup (like ours).

We are looking for:

  • bright and smart guys
  • one who can fit in our (small team/company/startup) culture, and becomes a great team player
  • can learn, adapt and use cutting/bleeding edge technologies
  • can inspire and mentor others
  • importantly, loves building cool, useful and scalable products/services

Experience, we would like to see:

  • Application Developer
    • Proficiency with web standards and frontend (HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, etc.) development
    • proficiency with one ore more languages (Python, Ruby, PHP, Scala, etc.)
    • proficiency with analytical approach to problem solving
    • has worked or very interested to work on other frameworks (Django, Rails, Symfony, etc.)
  • Mobile Application Developer (iOS or Android or both) – apps/games development;

Details description can be found at http://jobs.hasgeek.com/at/allies.co.in

We are not rigid about number of years (of experience). We think experience comes out of depth, challenges one has taken, and how many great problems one has solved over the time. If someone has all that, we are happy to talk to him/her.

If you are interested or know someone who is good fit; I would appreciate, if you can connect with me (aqabiz at allies.co.in) and share details.

DeltaCopy: Backup software utility for windows

We have one Windows server, which is there for many reasons. Taking backup on windows can be pain, one has to rely on third-party software. We use DeltaCopy, which relies on rsync (an awesome piece of open-source software), statically linked Cygwin libraries/binaries.

It is easy to setup and doesn’t conflict with any existing Cygwin installation.

DeltaCopy has saved us from many disasters(disk failure, etc.), some of those happened during last one month. Had we not taken daily, weekly and monthly backup snapshots, we would have lost months of work.

Thanks to DeltaCopy and developers/company/community behind it. This post is my way of thanking them, by spreading some words.

Using DeltaCopy is very intuitive, however, feel free to leave comments, if you need any help setting it up.

Don’t live with broken windows

Most of us have heard about “Don’t live with broken windows” or “Broken Window Theory” in software world, through books (Pragmatic Programmers by Andy Hunt and Dave Thomas, The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell) and other sources (wikipedia, blogs, articles, etc).

Like many others, I have also experienced that Broken Window Theory applies to many business and personal-life (and many others) other than software-development.

Over the time I have read books and articles, as listed below to learn more and apply in day to day life. You might following links useful.

Another Common Early Start-up Mistake

In most common early start-up mistakes, Mark Suster talks about very interesting and insightful points. However, I feel like adding one more point, quite known but often taken granted, more specific to software or web start-ups.

If you are a software or web start-up, it’s really important to use the experience of founders (if they are come from technical background) or your core team to have following in order, as soon as possible.

Guidelines and best-practices: code, documentation (wiki), version-control (branching/tagging – when and how?), bug-tracking, testing (unit-tests, functional-tests), deployment, performance objectives and related stuff.

I would not go crazy (get distracted too much) about these initially but have these in place and encourage(mandatory – certain cases) everyone to contribute, follow, discuss and document. It’s lot easier to adapt things at an earlier stage rather than later.

I strongally recommend you to read Martin Fowler‘s article Technical Debt to learn more about the importance of having things in order.